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Friday, August 04, 2017, 17:39
HK’s largest Chinese ink painting exhibition opens
By Dara Wang and Nora Zheng in Hong Kong
Friday, August 04, 2017, 17:39 By Dara Wang and Nora Zheng in Hong Kong

A visitor appreciates a crane and lotus painting at the Ink Global art exhibition at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre on Thursday. The exhibition opens to the public from today (Friday) until noon on Tuesday. (PARKER ZHENG / CHINA DAILY)

The city’s largest exhibition of Chinese ink paintings will be unveiled on Friday. Selected from 1,500 artworks, Ink Global presents 500 masterpieces by artists from 15 countries and regions at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.

He Jiaying’s Autumn is estimated to have the highest value,  HK$30 million, among all the exhibits. His work depicts a girl wearing a white sweater meditating under a tree in fall.

He told China Daily he uses the embossed painting technique, an ancient Chinese method that highlights the details of the knit. People can see the coarse surface of the sweater, said He, who wants to draw viewers to look closely at his work.

Pigment suffuses every corner of He’s painting without leaving any blanks. The purplish sky surrounds the girl sitting on high ground without any gap. He said it is very uncommon to leave no blanks in a Chinese ink painting. In this way, He said he wanted to redefine the space and inspire people to reimagine the relationship of the sky and the ground.

An opening ceremony of the Ink Global art exhibition is held at Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center on Aug 3, 2017. (PARKER ZHENG / CHINA DAILY)

Exhibition Curator Kwok Ho-mun said it is the first time animals are included as a major theme in the exhibition of modern Chinese ink paintings. Traditional ink painting only has landscape, portraits, and birds and flowers as the themes.

Huang Jiongqing’s painting Mother and Son, featuring horses, expresses the joy and pride of Hong Kong’s return to the motherland. The horse is often used as a symbol of success and pleasure in Chinese culture. In Huang’s painting a colt (young male horse), having endured suffering, returns to the warm embrace of his mother and regains support and comfort. Here Huang borrows a Chinese idiom of success being attained upon the arrival of a horse to commemorate the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to the motherland.

Other highlights include Hibiscus Picking by Huang Yongyu, 93, the oldest painter to participate in the Ink Global show. With stroke texture and bright color, the flowers look more energetic under Wong’s paint brush.

Kwok said with a high standard, the exhibition will be a milestone in the history of Chinese ink painting. “We are reaching the second-highest peak in Chinese ink painting’s history after the Song Dynasty (960–1279),” Kwok said.

Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor and Jao Tsung-I, a world renowned scholar on traditional Chinese culture, will visit the exhibition on Saturday. Other guests include lawmakers, senior officials promoting culture, arts, youth education and renowned painters.

The exhibition will be open from Friday to Tuesday.

A visitor appreciates paintings at the Ink Global art exhibition at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center on Aug 3, 2017. (PARKER ZHENG / CHINA DAILY)

Two visitors appreciate a painting at the Ink Global art exhibition at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center on Aug 3, 2017. (PARKER ZHENG / CHINA DAILY)

Contact the writer at dara@chinadailyhk.com

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